Joy-Ann Reid Says The Practice of Racial Profiling Is Very Real In America

MSNBC contributor and national journalist Joy-Ann "Joy" Reid, wearing red dress, meet with guests at Sacramento's Evolve the Gallery last month. Reid's appearance was hosted by the Sacramento Chapter of 100 Black Women Incorporated. OBSERVER photo by Antonio R. Harvey

MSNBC contributor and national journalist Joy-Ann “Joy” Reid, wearing red dress, meet with guests at Sacramento’s Evolve the Gallery last month. Reid’s appearance was hosted by the Sacramento Chapter of 100 Black Women Incorporated.
OBSERVER photo by Antonio R. Harvey

OAK PARK — National Journalist Joy-Ann Reid Says The Practice Is Very Real In America. The practice of “racial profiling” impacts African Americans every day, and is even terrifying for many, so says nationally acclaimed journalist and commentator Joy-Ann Reid.

Ms. Reid, who used her words and voice as an on-air MSNBC contributor to help bring attention to the Trayvon Martin case, talked about the trauma that racial profiling inflicts on Blacks during her speaking engagement in Sacramento.

“I think when the President came out and spoke, it shocked a lot of people,”said Ms. Reid.
She said that many were surprised that the leader of the free world had also been subjected to racial profiling.

Ms. Reid was a guest at a reception held in her honor hosted by the Sacramento Chapter of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women Inc. (NCBW).
“We have also heard about Oprah (Winfrey) getting profiled, Kendrick Lamar getting profiled, and also QuestLove,” she said. “People are realizing that these are not just isolated events. This is part of the life of African Americans.”

Ms. Reid was in Sacramento recently serving as the keynote speaker for the local NCBW’s 12th Annual Business and Community Awards Recognition Luncheon. The organization hosted “An Evening With Joy-Ann Reid,” at Evolve The Gallery, in Oak Park, where she met with many community leaders, awardees, and students from the William Lee College Prep School.

Ms. Reid said the killing of 17-year-old Martin was a tragedy, though racial profiling and Florida’s “Stand Your Ground Law” served as a backdrop in the case.

The acquittal of Martin’s killer, George Zimmerman, allowed President Barack Obama to express his feelings about teen and the prevalence and discrimination in this country.

“The Trayvon Martin case was the first time in a long time that non-Black America really realized the trauma that profiling visits on African Americans,” said Ms. Reid.

“For a lot of my White friends and colleagues it was surprising. They didn’t know that this is an issue that has been boiling in the hearts of African Americans for decades. This is something we worry about. And, transferring that fear from police to civilians is terrifying for African Americans,” she added.

Ms. Reid’s career in media began in 1998 when she began working as a morning news writer for FOX Miami affiliate WSVN. In 2003, Ms. Reid was a Knight Center for Specialized Journalism fellow. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Visual and Environmental Studies (with a concentration in documentary film) from Harvard University.

From 2006-2007, Ms. Reid produced and co-hosted the radio morning show, “Wake Up South Florida.” In 2008, she briefly worked on South Florida urban media outreach for Obama’s presidential campaign.

Ms. Reid and her husband own a production company, IMAGELAB, which focus primarily on film documentaries.

“She makes the Black community absolutely proud,” local NCBW event chairperson Sharon B. Rawls said of Ms. Reid.

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By Antonio Harvey
OBSERVER Staff Writer